A Drawing A Day 0075

A Drawing A Day is an extra resource for those who did or are doing the paid Figure Drawing Course and / or the free Introduction To DrawingThis is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on Fabriano Accademia 200gsm paper 38cm x 30cm (14.96in x 11.81in)
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A Drawing A Day 0073

A Drawing A Day is an extra resource for those who did or are doing the paid Figure Drawing Course and / or the free Introduction To DrawingThis is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on Fabriano Accademia 200gsm paper 38cm x 30cm (14.96in x 11.81in)
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A Drawing A Day 0072

A Drawing A Day is an extra resource for those who did or are doing the paid Figure Drawing Course and / or the free Introduction To DrawingThis is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on Fabriano Accademia 200gsm paper 38cm x 30cm (14.96in x 11.81in)
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A Drawing A Day 0065

A Drawing A Day is an extra resource for those who did or are doing the paid Figure Drawing Course and / or the free Introduction To DrawingThis is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on Fabriano Accademia 200gsm paper 38cm x 30cm (14.96in x 11.81in)
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A Drawing A Day 0057

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9in x 12.5in)

More legs. No kidding. On purpose. After the initial few posts I thought it might be better to give it all a bit of a structure. So once there were a few leg studies I decided to stay with the leg an once we had enough angles, views and positions, I’d move up the body. So after the upper leg, knee, lower leg and the foot we will have some pelvis, then rib cage and so on and so on. So do not despair, it’s not legs all the way. ;–))

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A Drawing A Day 0051

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk and graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9in x 12.5in)
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A Drawing A Day 0041

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a red chalk and pen and ink drawing on Fabriano Accademia 200gsm paper 38cm x 30cm (14.96in x 11.81in)
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A Drawing A Day 0017

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm (18.9in x 12.5in), drawing time 1.5 hrs

In drawing sessions I heard many times the artists deciding whether a model is good or not. And I do want to believe what they meant was they personally did not like the poses the model was taking up. Because there is no such thing as a model that is not good. Or a pose that is not good. There’s only a person who is unable to draw the body in a certain pose. That’s all.
Whether the model is young or old, tall or short, slim or fat makes no difference. They all have their bodies through which they communicate their humanity. And that is always worth drawing. Just a thought.

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And a bit more detail.
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A Drawing A Day 0015

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 32cm x 48cm (12.5in x 18.9in), drawing time 30 minutes

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A Drawing A Day 0010

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on Simili Japon 225gsm paper 48cm x 32cm  (18.9″ x 12.5″)
By now, I suspect you’d like to see something else, something other than simple geometric shapes. But that’s just it. Nothing happens without them. Get these right and 75% of your drawing difficulties disappear. Clearly the more you do these exercises, the better you’ll get at them, but it is an ongoing engagement. The human body is way too complex to run out of new ways of drawing the same number of muscles and bones. And that, I suppose is also the pleasure of it. The start might be daunting, frustrating, full of doubts…but once you get past a certain point and you start creating with what you already know, there’s no stopping the joy. Then the geometric shapes are not an obligation. They are your new best friend and you can’t get enough of them. Want some more? ;–))
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A Drawing A Day 0005

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on tinted Fabriano Academia 200gsm paper 50cm x 35cm (19.6″ x 13.7″)
This drawing continues in the all important vein of simplifying the complex form into basic geometric shapes. Then in the last image a small reminder of how easy it is to push too far. Knowing when to stop is just as important.
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A Drawing A Day 0004

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on paper 32cm x 48cm (12.59″ x 18.89″)
I took a progress shot first, as this described best the use of simple geometric shapes and then I took the study a bit further showing again the importance of training the lightness of your hand. If you do, there’s quite a bit you can change in a drawing even if you choose to use the supporting lines of the geometric shapes to guide you. Apart from these I also used the shape of the rib cage and the shape of the ball representing the pelvis is slightly shaped in the form of the underlying pelvis. In figure drawing your geometric forms will progressively blend into the skeletal structures and you will be able to choose on the fly the shape that does the best job in representing what you want to show to the viewer.
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0004_IMG_8020_8024_commented_woAll three images have exactly the same “levels” setting in Photoshop so that the comparison for the disappearance of the supporting lines is possible.
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A Drawing A Day 0003

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a graphite drawing on paper 32cm x 27cm (12.59″ x 10.62″)
0003_IMG_8019_clean_woA study in constructing the body from simple geometric shapes. I am trying to keep the shading down to a bare minimum. This is to guide you more towards seeing shapes rather than light and shade. Where I use it, I use it to emphasise the shape of the geometry. I don’t want to enter into the “shading world” as yet, but that is exactly what shading is supposed to do. To support the form. A really good form can support itself with no shading at all. That’s where the pure line drawing comes in. All of that is still coming in the free articles and videos section.

To come back to the shading I used in this drawing, please observe that all of it is made of lines. There’s no blotches, smudges, finger rubbing…. If possible, it would be good to refrain from those. Use lines. If you do, you will have to make a decision about where to put your lines, how hard should they be drawn, what direction should they run, how many, how close to each other…. That means you will have to think about how to support the illusion of the three dimensionality of the form on the two dimensional sheet of paper. Wonderful. A figure drawing.

Here are some more examples of the use of simple geometric shapes. This is really important. In fact the three rules are the most important part of figure and any other drawing. If you don’t get this right, nothing you add will work. Practise these and you will be amazed how fast your progress will be.
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A Drawing A Day 0002

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing, 48cm x 32cm (18.8″ x 12.5″).
IMG_8015_11102014_clean_woOk, with this one, there are a couple of things I can point out. First of all I am proving my own statement about multitasking. So I sit down and while I draw this 10 minutes long sketch, my mind is wondering all over the place thinking about some urgent matter. Multitasking, ha?
I have drawn for a while, so even with a seriously wondering mind I do produce something. But I finish and look at it (this time with my mind present) and I get annoyed. But then, I remind myself, this is actually a good thing, and we are here to learn.

The first thing that I see is that this is a woman made up of several bodies. The head, the upper torso and the arms belong to one woman, then the pelvic region and the upper legs come from another woman and then the right lower leg and foot are borrowed from the third person. It’s not immediately obvious, it just feels a bit odd. This is what I call the drawing not being convincing. It is a drawing, it is kind of ok, but…errrrr….not really. Then you see what is wrong with it and you cannot unsee it. Now you cannot stop seeing how bad it is, in fact.
The cause in this case is not really what some call the proportions. I think in this case inconsistency in size of the different body parts comes form a misjudgement of perspective, and the sizes are just a consequence.
Anyway, I think unconsciously (while my mind was in la–la land) I was seeing the problem because of the way I approached the need to place the chair on the same floor as the feet. In fact I drew the right foot first, then I drew the chair and after that the left foot. But you can see how I used the rectangular shape on the floor representing the bottom of a cube to work out the perspective.
Now, there is yet another problem that is ruining the illusion of this lady. This problem is very well explained and discussed in the free video called The Loss Of Volume. Let me show you what I mean in this drawing:
IMG_8015_11102014_commented_woIf I take the left side of the torso as accurate in size and shape, then I have cut off quite a bit of the right hand side of it. In terms of simplest possible geometric shapes, the right side of the torso, the shoulder and the right upper arm are really just three cylinders meeting in the green ball like shape of the deltoideus. If you follow the right hand side of the torso, the oragne line climbing up and under the armpit is what restores the torso to its rightful size. This also pushed the right upper arm, where it meets the deltoideus further out to make room. It’s not a big change in terms of measurements, but it makes all the difference. This little adjustment also creates the illusion of the torso being more rotated and lends the pose quite a bit of extra character.

So there it is. The wondering mind.

A Drawing A Day 0001

Random drawing I did today or just very recently relating to the free “Introduction To Drawing” and / or the Figure Drawing Course lectures. This may be just a post of a drawing itself, or with a short commentary (my preferred option), or even a video where I can also draw to clarify the points.
This is to encourage your drawing practices, to support and shorten your learning curve, and to invite you to post your artwork (in the “Student Work” category) where others can comment and everyone coming to the site and blog benefits. Happy Drawing!

The following is a black chalk drawing on tinted paper, 20cm x 35cm (7.8″ x 13.7″). I want to mention (although the articles about this in the “Introduction To Drawing” are still pending) how important it is to train your hand to be light. I had to put the image through Photoshop to improve visibility of the lines. If the lines you draw are light, you have options. You can still change things without loosing the drawing.
P1030847_clean_weboptBut the main thing I want to point out is about the “Three Basic Rules”, especially the second one about simplifying complex forms into simple geometric shapes. More about this is also mentioned in the “Grasping The Complex” article and then the video below that article.
P1030847_commented_webopt1/ The side of the torso can very well be represented by a simple cylinder. My cylinder has a few alterations on it, such as a change in diameter (thickness) and a bend. These are the details you can add later. After you have decided the shape will be well represented by a cylinder, you have visualised it in your mind and know what lines to draw to get it on the paper. At that stage you may pause: Are there any smaller variations about the basic cylinder with which I could even better represent this shape on the torso? And if you can name the variations, then you have a mental image of them and you can draw them.
Note: This is a very meticulous dissection of the process so that it can be understood. The moment you start using it, you’d be surprised how fast it disappears into the subconscious and leaves you free to focus on the drawing itself rather than how to draw it.

2/ The next example is about combining a cylinder with a cube–like shape in the middle of it. I have used it to quickly represent the bottom part of the long head of triceps, which would bulge considerably in this position. The same muscle is embedded in the general shape of the upper arm, which is cylinder–like. Therefore the combination of the two seemed the best to convey the shape, rotation and orientation of the upper arm. Of course, this cylinder meets at the top of the upper arm the ball like shape of the deltoideus. There’s a tiny line drawn with more force to show the deltoideus overlaping the triceps.

3/ The egg–like shape in the example number three explains the shape of another bulging muscle. You can find the muscles of the shoulder girdle explained in detail in the Figure Drawing Course, but you can also find the basics in the free Lecture on the Shoulder.

4/ Example number four is again a combination of the general cylidrical shape of the lower leg and the ball like protrusion of the bottom bit of fibula.

5/ Egg like shape describes very well the gastrocnemius group at that back of the lower leg.

6/ Here is a good example of using a triangle to represent the foot.

And there’s another one I did not number. The series of cubes to make the fingers easy to position in space.
So there it is. If your lines are light (which they will be in time with practise), most of these indications of geometric shapes would disappear into the further developed drawing.

A Drawing A Day

Hello everyone,

Ever since I started working on the free “Introduction To Drawing” content, I’ve been thinking about the best way to communicate the concepts of drawing. How to hand it over.
So, there are the articles that verbally explain what you need to be thinking about when drawing and why. Then there are the videos with demonstration of the content of the articles. There’s quite a bit of free videos on the site as well, the “Common Mistakes” edition, the “Work In Progress” episodes, the cut down versions of all the 13 Lectures, but it still felt to me a bit disconnected.

Another thing I really wanted to be understood is, that most of the drawings by far anyone does, are studies. As the name implies, these are opportunities where the artist undertakes his study of the human form. By default this means a stack of messy drawings geared towards discovering the next gem we are ready to see. Perhaps a line sitting exactly where needs to be. An example of nice massing. An expression of body language that leaves no doubt about an internal life of the figure. These discoveries are the building blocks of the visual language we are learning. You absorb these visual expressions and when you own them, you use them to create your “clean” artwork that will be exhibited. Naturally from time to time there will be a study that can be accepted as finished artwork. That would contain so much aliveness that the messiness will not matter. But that is up to each of you to decide what is an accomplished drawing and what is a quiet discovery.

So thinking about the disconnection – the not “enoughness” of the examples demonstrating Figure Drawing as I intended – as a peek over the shoulder, plus wanting you to look for the gems in your studies, I have decided to post a drawing a day. Perhaps I should say “A Study A Day” as most of them will be studies. These will be random drawings I did the same day or just a few days ago. They will be showing what I am preoccupied with. They may be just posts by themselves (especially if the time is short) or they may have a bit of a commentary (my preferred option) particularly linking by example into the “Introduction To Drawing” or even into the Figure Drawing Course lectures. Occasionaly they might be show in a form of a video where I can also draw to clarify the points. I have created a new Category called “A Drawing A Day” and each post will be numbered so they are easy to find if you want to refer back to a particular drawing. I will attemp to post the drawings at around the same time of the day so the publishing can become a daily cycle.

So there it is. Now, I am also hoping that this will encourage you to post your drawings and get from your fellow subscribers a feedback that will benefit everyone reading the posts. And remember: There is no such thing as a bad drawing.

Tomorrow.

Free Online Drawing Lessons

Hello everyone. Great news!

The first part of the new Free Online Drawing Resource is now ready. Introducing extra material has changed the website design and layout a bit, which means things have slightly moved around. I believe, the new navigation will be easy to use. I have placed the warning of nude content on the first page that loads (animated intro), and viewing of the Disclaimer is now optional as a pop up window. Clicking on “Learn To Draw With” and/or “The Ultimate Figure Drawing Course” are links to enter the site. All the pages now have a navigation bar at the top for quick access to everything.
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The “Home” page starts the free education section of the site. In the column on the left, below your testimonials are also the links to all the articles and video tutorials of the free “Introduction To Drawing”. This also gives a visual sense of the structure of these tutorials. The links in orange are live and have content.
Screen-Shot-2014-10-06-at-16.35_woptIn the last article (“Drawing Step By Step”) I have published the list of the planed free online drawing lessons. As you will see on the site, the list of these articles and video tutorials has slightly changed. The change, however, is not in content. Only in form. If I felt some of the topics were related or even dependent on each other in terms of learning to draw, I grouped them under a single topic. So everything you asked for is still there, or coming soon, as it has been announced.

In the same article I also said it will take some time to compile all the lessons, articles and videos. However, the first of the 5 groups of tutorials is ready and so I chose to release these, so those who want to, can start. The rest of the 5 groups will follow progressively.

In the menu bar, the “Learning” tab is for the free “Introduction To Drawing”, and the “Courses” tab is for the paid Figure Drawing Online Course. The “Free Stuff” tab has the free stuff not belonging to the “Introduction To Drawing”. Among these are the “Common Mistake” videos, the cut down versions of the 13 lectures and “Work In Progress”.

I have also decided to stop selling the “Lecture 0 – Where To Start” as many of the concepts it contains are now explained (or will be soon) in the free “Introduction To Drawing”.

The website is up and running and I am still testing all the links, so please, if you find something not working, let me know. Enjoy!

Ohhh, yes…and there’s another bit of good news coming in a couple of days. ;–))

The Stone Piece Nr1 – “Deliverance” Part 3

Welcome to the third and last part of the article about the sandstone carving “Deliverance”.

As I said at the end of part 2 I have decided to keep the clay model and exhibit it. I felt it can stand on it’s own. Instead of firing and glazing the piece I have decided to coat it with metal. Bronze to be exact. For this I used a metal coating process of a company called Sculpt Nouveau. They produce patinas and metal finishes that can be applied, if I am not mistaken, to any surface. A porous surface such as clay doesn’t have to be sealed if it is cured (bisque fired in case of the clay). The metal coating will soak into the cured material deeper if it isn’t sealed and so you might have to use more of the Metal Coating. Also, using Traditional Patinas (the ones that react and affect the metal) should be applied to wet / damp Metal Coating. The metal is suspended in an acrylic binder so when it dries, more of the acrylic rises to the surface of the metal thus reducing the effectiveness of the Patina. The company provides all the necessary components of the process and have great demo videos showing the process.
Now, I feel I need to make a clear distinction here. This is not a paint that would resemble an aged bronze surface. This is not an imitation. It is the real thing. The coating is made of the real metal and by applying the patina to the dry metal surface it creates the same effect as if the metal was exposed to weather. I think that makes all the difference.

So here are the finished pieces:
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And here is the sandstone carving:
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